flyingSquirrel
I like this idea!
I was going to suggest the dedicated "official" NASA page as a source:
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html
but the page at mreclipse.com seems better structured, markup-wise, appearing to be more consistently parsable than the one at Nasa.gov.

mreclipse.com or nasa.gov pages might be processed in order to make a Longtail o Fathead Instant Answer: their markup doesn't employ sensible content identifiers like schemas, but the data tables on mreclipse.com look like usable sources, like this one covering an entire century: http://www.eclipsewise.com/solar/SEcatalog/SE2001-2100.html

NASA has (had?) its own API, although I find its lack of documentation disturbing (sorry, I couldn't resist :) ...), I couldn't find anything eclipse-related and ProgrammableWeb says it's deprecated.
http://data.nasa.gov/api-info/

Timeanddate has a nice-looking set of APIs, but they only offer a paid license so it's a no-go.
http://www.timeanddate.com/services/api/

I couldn't find any more APIs that expose data about astronomical phenomena, but I'll keep looking.
posted by flyingSquirrel 4 years and 2 months ago Link

Jag
We're partners with TimeAndDate, so if it's available in the API that would be cool
posted by Jag Staff4 years and 15 days ago Link
neosilky
I'd be interested in working on this, what details can you give me RE: the partnership? I need access to the API to continue!

Thanks!
posted by neosilky 4 years and 14 days ago Link
Moollaza
@neosilky you can simply reference the API KEYS in the same manner as the Time Spice, and you'll be able to use our API Keys through DuckPAN.

https://github.com/duckduckgo/zeroclicki...
posted by Moollaza Staff4 years and 13 days ago Link
javathunderman
Also found this on a duplicate IA suggestion: http://seasky.org/astronomy
posted by javathunderman Community Leader3 years and 8 months ago Link